New Routes Mean More Noise/Pollution for Some Homes near Airports-and Millions of Homes Far Away from Airports  

 

What does it mean to live “near an airport”? Millions of U.S. citizens living in formerly peaceful neighborhoods are now discovering, years or even decades later, that they bought or rented homes near airports.

The reason: The FAA’s ongoing implementation of NextGen, its new satellite-based air traffic control system.  NextGen was fast-tracked through Congress in 2012 without public hearings or environmental impact studies.

NextGen lets commercial jetliners fly closer together at lower altitudes — as low as 1,000 feet, every 60 seconds, creating “highways in the sky.” In consequence, people living five or 10 or more miles from airports are suddenly being bombarded with toxic emissions and noise pollution created by continuous low-flying aircraft.

The headline of a recent NextGen article in the Wall Street Journal is misleading. While it’s true that new routes mean more noise for some homes near airports, it’s also true — as the article itself reports — that people who have been living in their homes for many years have suddenly learned that they live “near airports.”

The most obvious problem with NextGen is the aircraft noise, which is detrimental to human health. But equally dangerous is the jet fuel-created air pollution that carpets the ground below with carcinogens. These particles, less than 2.5 microns in size, are implicated in asthma and many respiratory ailments, lung diseases, learning deficits, cardiac issues, even autism.

You can read the full text of the article by following this link:  http://on.wsj.com/1PUAshZ

 The WSJ’s author Scott McCartney writes, “Planes began flying new routes in Minneapolis from 2012 to 2014. But the FAA suspended implementation of them after protests…”

Your input can make a difference. Make your voice heard.

Contact your New York city, state and federal representatives. Find them here: NextGenNoise.org. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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